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Koreo Prize Press Release



Koreo Prize creates platform for new perspectives on the UK's social issues

  • The 2017 Koreo Prize is the first national platform for young people to explore new perspectives on complex social issues affecting the UK, with more than 100 teams submitting competition entries
  • The prize was judged by experts in cross-sector social change, including the Managing Director of Leon and the CEO of the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation
  • Submissions covered a huge breadth of topics aligned with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals – gender equality, social mobility, food security, community resilience, wellbeing and social housing.
  • The competition will run again this year – those interested in the Koreo Prize 2018 can already submit their interest.
The first Koreo Prize has concluded today, with six finalists awarded for their contributions to the discussion on social issues in the UK. The winner, Felicity Abraham*, a 19-year-old law student from London, was given £5,000 for her project on honour killings.

 

The Koreo Prize 2017 challenged young people under the age of 27 to explore one of six social issues aligned with the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals: gender equality, social mobility, food security, community resilience, wellbeing and social housing.

 

The competition aimed to generate fresh perspectives on these social issues, before the UK defines how it will tackle the UN Sustainable Development goals in a national context.

 

Participants were judged on their ability to tell a compelling story that provided real insight and considered a social issue from different perspectives. There were no restrictions on the media each project could use and final submissions included documentaries, social media campaigns, photography, poetry and plays.

 

More than 1000 young people downloaded details of the competition, with more than 100 teams from across the UK submitting their stories on social issues.
Finalist projects included a critical review of the UK’s approach to honour based crime, an exploration of social mobility through intergenerational interviews in London’s Afro-Carribean communities and a project outlining the consequences of ignoring the UK’s social housing crisis.

 

The prize was judged by experts in cross-sector social change, with the awards designed to encourage participants to continue to focus on their project long term.

 

Judges included Caroline Mason, CEO of the Esmee Fairbairn Foundation, John Upton, Managing Director of Leon, and Indy Johar, co-founder of Architecture00 and Dark Matter Labs.

 

Alongside a £5,000 cash prize for the winner, 5 runners-up were awarded mentoring and speaking opportunities at global conferences.




John Upton, Managing Director of Leon, said:

“I was both privileged and humbled to be a judge for the Koreo Prize.  The creativity, granularity and passion with which all of the finalists took on their challenge was amazing.  Their output, both individually and collectively, made me realise just how positive we should be about the future, and how our next generation of young people can and will make a real difference to society.”

Judith Grant, Associate Director of Health and Wellbeing at Mace Group, said:

“The prize was an outstanding opportunity for young people to showcase their exceptional understanding of, and solutions to, the UK’s most pressing issues.

“At only 19, [winner] Felicity Abraham* has shown us where the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals can be developed further and how the UK can address this when outlining the national strategy to implement the goals by 2030.”

Caroline Mason, CEO of the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation, said:

“It has been a privilege to be part of the Koreo Prize.  The quality of the submissions was humbling.  The judges on the panel were wise and expert and helped to guide what was such a difficult decision.  But the right one – congratulations!”

The Koreo Prize is just one way in which talent consultancy Koreo is encouraging people across the UK to consider their social impact. Since 2009, Koreo has become one of the UK’s leading people development providers for organisations with a social purpose.

 

The Koreo Prize 2018 is now open and will focus on the UN Sustainable Development Goals at work for people of all ages. Those interested in receiving more information, can express their interest from today.

 

Find more information about the Koreo Prize 2017 and see this year’s submissions.

 

 *Felicity Abraham is a pseudonym as the participant wished to remain anonymous.

 

 

Koreo Prize Judges:
  • Julie Bentley, CEO of Girl Guiding
  • John Upton, Managing Director at LEON
  • Indy Johar, Co-founder of Architecture00 and Dark Matter Labs
  • Anna Taylor, Executive Director of the Food Foundation
  • Natalie Campbell, Co-founder, Very Good Company and Co-chair, Grant Thornton’s Vibrant Economy
  • Immy Kaur, Co-founder of Impact Hub Birmingham
  • Martin Sandbrook, Director of the Schumacher Institute
  • Caroline Mason, CEO of the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation
  • Dr. Gary Haq, Senior Research Associate, Stockholm Environment Institute at the University of York
  • Vicky Sleight, Managing Director, EMEA, iTalent Corp and Founder and CEO for Perfect Ltd
  • Judith Grant, Associate Director of Health and Wellbeing at Mace Group
  • Paul Cleal, Partner at PwC
  • Professor Henrietta Moore, Director of UCL’s Institute for Global Prosperity
  • Anjali Ramachandran, Co-founder of Ada’s List
  • Clive Fathers, Partner at Grant Thornton UK LLP
  • Fern Miller, Chief Marketing Officer, Digitas LBi

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